18 Comments
Sep 15, 2023Liked by Michael Eades

Super Arrow, Mike! Enjoyed MD's travelogue verrah much. -- though I've never seen the show. (Half Scots, I am!) Lovely country.

Looking forward to your views on the VAXXX.... (someone, I forget who, said he always spells it that way in YouTube descriptions and elsewhere, so the algorithms will think it's about porn and leave it alone). Smart guy. (Or smart@ss?)

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I'm not sure even VAXXX will prevent banning, but who knows.

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Sep 15, 2023Liked by Michael Eades

Wow is right! Loved MD's travelogue, although Outlander isn't a series I've ever tackled. I did that kind of living with literature with all of Faulkner's works - that was difficult enough for me with all of his insane characters. I honestly don't know how she's kept that cast of thousands in Outlander straight..

The only question in MDs section:

whipped a 18-19 year

whipped an 18-19 year ?

And yours:

step in a do a little travelog

step in and do a little . . .

Very much looking forward to your take on vaccines. I was distressed to notice that Jeopardy is now advertising that it's "brought to you by Moderna" and pushing hard for everyone to take the new triple vax so you won't get Covid, RSV, and flu. Disgusting almost covers it.

Loved the pictures you put in this time too.

Best and safe home.

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How about that. I'm a Faulkner fan, too. Read pretty much all of his stuff back in the day. Probably need to reread some of it now. Can't step in the same river twice and all that. My gateway drug for Faulkner was his short story "A Rose for Emily." Once I read that, I was hooked. I've even visited Faulkner's home, Rowan Oak, several times. Oxford, Mississippi isn't that far from Little Rock. And Square Books in Oxford is a great bookstore.

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My Faulkner gateway drug was Go Down, Moses - mostly because I wanted to figure out how all those characters were related to one another, which took me enough years that I wound up writing my Master’s thesis on his novels. Went to UMiss a couple of years for the annual conference (sort of like Low Carb Down Under - but with talks all literary and carbs through the roof - never could get a breakfast without grits!). The opening party for the conference was held at Rowan Oak (where you couldn’t - at the time - have an alcoholic drink - talk about sublime irony!!) and the closing party was at Square Books; you’re so right - a terrific bookstore.

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Sep 15, 2023Liked by Michael Eades

I always look forward to the Arrow with varied topics, but was especially delighted this week by the addition of MD’s travelogue. I too am an Outlander addict (as is my husband) after first hearing about the show sometime in the last year when you mentioned MD’s interest. Am very pleased to hear that she is also working on the 3rd book of her series.

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Yep, she's writing away on book #3. And is delighted so many people enjoyed her travelogue.

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Sep 15, 2023Liked by Michael Eades

Although I have never seen Outlander, I loved the travelogue. The photos, blue skies and Scottish style in many places that I visited as a kid were brilliant. MD does have a way with words!

I wondered if you had time to visit Falkland Palace? Sounds like a great holiday!

Also wondering if you have seen Richard Feinmans blog Nutrition in Crisis featuring your mass video? He also uses the PHC as a source. As a proud PHC Ambassador and reader of your blog, I found it very interesting, just wished that I had studied physics at some point!

Keenly anticipating next weeks Arrow!

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We saw Falkland Palace, but we didn't tour it. it had no Outlander connection, and on the day we visited Falkland it was all Outlander all the time.

I did read Richard's blog about my mass balance video. I updated that talk with the one I gave in San Diego last month. The video isn't available yet. In it, I think I answered most of Richard's questions or disagreements he had with the first video. But to tell the truth, I didn't see his blog until I was going through the Highlands. I was trying to read it on my phone in the back seat of a van, so not the best circumstances to give it my complete attention. We'll be back in the States this weekend, so I'll give it another read when I'm not in a moving vehicle.

I, too, love the PHC. (Public Health Collaboration for those readers who don't know. https://phcuk.org).

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Sep 15, 2023Liked by Michael Eades

A few weeks ago you recommended the book "Pompeii" by Robert Harris, Thank you, I really enjoyed it and learned much I didn't know about the aqueducts.

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I'm glad you enjoyed it. MD and I have been to Pompeii at least six times over the years. I'm eager to go back again after reading Harris's book about it. I'll see the city with new eyes.

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Sep 15, 2023Liked by Michael Eades

My husband and I are also hooked on Outlander. I got him hooked on the books, and from there it was the equivalent of a short putt to get him hooked on the TV series. This time, the Outlander travelogue wins the award for Most Compelling. Thanks, MD!

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Sep 16, 2023·edited Sep 16, 2023Author

MD says she's glad you enjoyed it. And glad to know there is another member of the cult who reads The Arrow.

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Lallybrok and golf--does life get any better? Thanks for the travelogue...

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I wish there had been a little less Lallybroch and a little more golf.

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Sep 15, 2023Liked by Michael Eades

Please tell MD her descriptions and visuals were a wonderful journey. Have never seen the show but would love to fall through some stones periodically to escape the scaffolding of our current national chaos. The golf course shots were stunning as well, especially the sky colors. For those of us wallowing in the swill and mud of an ordinary existence, t'was a bonny journey!

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Yes, wouldn't we all love to fall through on occasion.

I'll pass the word along to MD that you enjoyed her travel writing.

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Dr Eades, the Richard Feynman quote and your thoughts on vaccine injuries reminded me of what the Feynman-led commission on the Challenger disaster reported: "NASA appeared to be requiring a contractor to prove that it was not safe to launch, rather than proving it was safe". We've really been put on the back foot, instead of the onus being on the government agencies to prove that the covid vaccines were "safe to launch", everyone else has been put in the position of having to prove their harm after the fact. It's now super easy for the government to simply dismiss any claims of harm as being unfounded, thereby shirking their responsibility for the decision to launch. In an honest, transparent world (remember that?), the government would have had to conclusively establish the safety of the vaccines before releasing them to the public. 

What has made matters far worse (both with the vaccine and with many other significant events that are claimed to be 'conspiracy theories') is that no standard baseline has been established against which variations, anomalies or outliers can be assessed. Consider, for example, the clinical trial process, a well-understood and established system through which all new drugs had to successfully pass before being marketed. This process should be the standard by which the safety and efficacy of vaccines are judged, but it is now common knowledge that it has been compromised, subverted and truncated by the government and its industry allies, rendering it useless for making any informed judgement about vaccines. One might even think that this was intentional!

If we are to make genuine progress together in restoring confidence, where it is warranted, in vaccines and other pharmaceutical products in general, I believe we need to be absolutely clear about what these benchmark standards must be, and evaluate against these standards what has actually transpired. This would avoid the "chucking stuff at the wall and hoping something sticks" that the public has been cornered into doing, and force the argument to be about what the benchmarks need to be and how the accumulating evidence measures up against them. We need to return to a model where the authorities demonstrate that it is "safe to launch", and away from the public being burdened with trying to prove the opposite (which is a fool's errand).

Report of the PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident, https://history.nasa.gov/rogersrep/v1ch5.htm

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